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WASHINGTON (AP) — She’s calling for an “intervention” to save the nation from him. He says she’s “crazy.”

The enmity between President Donald Trump and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi deteriorated Thursday into rude-and-then-some questioning of his fitness for office and her sanity, with personal attacks flowing from both the nation’s top elected officials after a dramatic blow-up at the White House.

However intended, the exchanges left uncertain ahead of the 2020 election whether Trump and the Democrats will be able to work together on serious, must-pass tasks, such as funding the government and raising the federal borrowing limit, let alone thornier issues such as immigration, national security and more.

Pelosi went first, with demure shrugs and practiced sass. Then, as a tornado warning blared across Washington, Trump followed with a derisive nickname — something he had declined to give her, up to now.

“She’s a mess,” Trump told reporters at an afternoon news conference in which he lined up White House staff to testify to his calmness the day before when he walked out after three minutes at a meeting with Pelosi and Senate Democratic leader Charles Schumer.

“Crazy Nancy. … I watched Nancy and she was all crazy yesterday.”

As for himself, he declared, “I’m an extremely stable genius.”

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi openly questioned President Donald Trump's fitness for office Thursday. At one point she even joked about the 25th Amendment, the Constitution's provision laying out the procedure for replacing a president. (May 23)

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Pelosi scolded back:

“When the ‘extremely stable genius’ starts acting more presidential, I’ll be happy to work with him on infrastructure, trade and other issues,” she tweeted.

There was more, before and after that exchange, for political enthusiasts with the time and interest to follow along.

For those who don’t: The theater came a day after Trump stalked out of the Cabinet Room demanding an end to all congressional investigations before he would work with Congress on repairing U.S. infrastructure or other matters. He apparently was wound up generally over the ongoing congressional Trump-Russia probes into whether he obstructed justice, and specifically by Pelosi’s jab a few minutes earlier at the Capitol that he “is engaged in a cover-up.”

“I don’t do cover-ups,” fumed Trump, who is fighting subpoenas for testimony by current and former White House officials.

Hanging over the increasingly personal exchanges is a drumbeat among about two dozen Democrats and one Republican to launch impeachment hearings against Trump based on special counsel Robert Mueller’s report, which described Trump’s efforts to block his federal investigation. Pelosi has resisted that impeachment pressure, preferring a methodical process by which Congress investigates and lays out the facts on the question of obstruction of justice. She says the House is “not on a path to impeachment,” but she’s been clear this week that an impeachment inquiry is not off the table.

Short of that, she’s been happy to give Trump a hard time all year, including questioning his manhood and forcing him to re-open the government without the border wall money he demanded. On Thursday, she said the White House is “crying out” for impeachment — the idea being that a vindication by the Republican-controlled Senate would help assure his re-election.

On Thursday, subtlety went by the wayside. Pelosi said Trump has established a pattern of unpredictability, and at one point she even joked about the 25th Amendment, the Constitution’s provision laying out the procedure for replacing a president.

White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders says "it's insane" to think infrastructure talks can continue as if House Speaker Nancy Pelosi had not accused President Donald Trump of a "cover-up." (May 23)

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“I wish that his family or his administration or his staff would have an intervention for the good of the country,” Pelosi said at her weekly news conference, adding that she prays for him and the nation.

“Maybe he wants to take a leave of absence,” she said. Asked whether she’s concerned about Trump’s well-being, she replied, “I am.”

Trump denied he wanted the House to formally charge him.

“I don’t think anybody wants to be impeached,” he said.

Pelosi, the second in line to the presidency, said she thinks Trump’s actions Wednesday were part of his skill at distraction. But she also suggested what he does isn’t all strategic.

“Sometimes when we’re talking to him he agrees,” she said, only to change his mind. “He says he’s in charge and he may be.”

During questions, Pelosi said she thought a reporter had asked about “statutory” intervention, the 25th Amendment.

“That’s a good idea,” she said with a smile. “I am going to take it up with my caucus. Not that they haven’t been thinking about it.”

She has been insulting Trump since the meeting Wednesday that was supposed to be about bridges and other crumbling infrastructure.

“For some reason, maybe it was lack of confidence on his part … he took a pass, and it just makes me wonder why he did that,” she told reporters back on Capitol Hill. “In any event I pray for the president of the United States.”

Trump tweeted back: “Nancy, thank you so much for your prayers, I know you truly mean it!”

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Associated Press Writers Lisa Mascaro, Mary Clare Jalonick, Zeke Miller and Jonathan Lemire contributed to this report.

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Follow Kellman and Miller on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/APLaurieKellman and http://www.twitter.com/ZekeJMiller .

BORIS Johnson looks set to take over from Theresa May as Prime Minister now she’s finally announced she will step down.

The 54-year-old ex-Foreign Secretary revealed last week he WOULD run to replace her, and his campaign is set to be in full swing within days.

 Boris is the favourite to take over from Theresa May

Getty Images – Getty

Boris is the favourite to take over from Theresa May

The bookies have had him as the favourite for months, and Tory members insist he is the one they want to take them into the next election too and fight Jeremy Corbyn.

His charisma, energy and bravado have already attracted voters from across the spectrum to him for years – giving him two successful terms as Mayor of London, and four election wins as an MP.

After much deliberation he was also on the winning side for the historic 2016 referendum – proving he’s in touch with the people of Britain and understands what they want.

He draws crowds wherever he goes and lines up supporters in a celebrity-like fashion – it would be foolish to rule out his chances.

Leadership candidates have already been meeting with MPs for weeks, begging them for their support, and Boris has been no exception.

He’s been smartening up with a new haircut, fresher suits, and he’s even lost weight to help win his more support and look like a PM in waiting.

But Boris has had relatively few friends in Parliament for years now – and it could be too little, too late to woo over the hundreds of MPs he needs to get down to the final two candidates.

He’ll have to make sure he has a great team around him to make that happen.

Fresh YouGov research today even said he was the most popular and least popular candidate in the running, showing how incredibly divisive he is among Tories and voters.

The top Tory has got a huge task on his hands to avoid the pitfalls from the last leadership race in 2016, which seriously damaged his credentials.

Boris was set to run on a joint ticket with Michael Gove, who eventually knifed him in the back and went for it alone.

Just hours later after a morning of chaos, Boris dramatically pulled out of the race.

During his time as Foreign Secretary he also came under fire for undermining statesmanship-like credentials with a string of gaffes and undignified behaviour – which he will have to overcome if he wants to enter No10.

His rival candidates will be keen to emphasise and capitalise on his weaknesses in the days ahead to try and slap him down before he gets the momentum going.

However, in recent days even Remainer MPs have coming around to the idea of Boris as PM, believing he might be the one to fight off Nigel Farage’s Brexit Party who are soaring in the polls.

The Tories are suffering a terrifying mauling from fuming voters for not delivering Brexit yet, and many think he’s the only one who can stop the Brexit Party tidal wave.

And he’ll be popular with many right-wingers in the Tory party by saying today we have to get out of the EU by October 31 – deal or No Deal.

“The way to get a good deal is to prepare for a no deal,” he said today at a conference in Switzerland.

And he added: “A new leader will have the opportunity to do things differently and have the momentum of a new administration.

“The job of our next leader has to be getting the UK properly out of the EU, putting Brexit to bed.”

One Remainer MP told The Sun: “I won’t back Boris at the start but might do in the later rounds.
“Maybe we need a strong Brexiteer to take on Jeremy Corbyn and Nigel Farage. And it certainly can’t be Dominic Raab.”

Boris last week tweeted his support of a group of One Nation values – pushed by moderate remainers like Amber Rudd and Damian Green – in a clear message that he wants their support for the top job and is prepared to compromise and mould his positions.

Last night ex-minister Gavin Williamson was revealed to be helping Boris become PM too, saying he’s the only Tory who can both deliver Brexit AND beat Labour.

His support will be vital for Boris as he’s got good relations with the Northern Irish party, the DUP, who could be vital in another government.

Loyal former minister Alastair Burt, when asked whether he could back Mr Johnson, told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: “The answer to the question for almost all the candidates is yes.

“I would find it very difficult to support a candidate who said it was in Britain’s best interest to leave with no deal, leave straight away…

“I don’t expect any candidate really to say that.”

Rising star Johnny Mercer, who some said could run for the top job himself, confirmed he was backing Boris to bring the country back together.

He told ITV that he needed to “go out and inspire the party, bring them together, and get over this issue”.

Then Britain could get back to everyday business of governing, he predicted optimistically.

 Boris Johnson is the biggest threat to Jeremy Corbyn getting into No10, Labour voters fear
Boris Johnson is the biggest threat to Jeremy Corbyn getting into No10, Labour voters fear
 Boris attracts supporters from the public wherever he goes - but has fewer MP friends

Darren Fletcher – The Sun

Boris attracts supporters from the public wherever he goes – but has fewer MP friends
 Many MPs think he could be the one to defeat Farage's Brexit Party - and are willing to throw their weight behind him

www.newsline-media.com

Many MPs think he could be the one to defeat Farage’s Brexit Party – and are willing to throw their weight behind him

Scottish MP Stephen Kerr said: “For me and my Scottish Conservative colleagues, strengthening the union must be a very strong theme in the prospectus that any prospective leader offers the Scottish Conservatives.

“I think Boris is aware, from my conversations with him, that he has to project a different image to the people of Scotland, there’s no doubt about that. He recognises that challenge.

“The reality is that Boris is a major player in this contest, but whoever is going to lead the Conservative Party, whoever puts themselves forward to lead the Conservative Party, is going to have to be a unifier.”

 Theresa May breaks down as she announces her resignation date outside No10 today

Dan Charity – The Sun

Theresa May breaks down as she announces her resignation date outside No10 today
 The PM leaving her home in Berkshire earlier

Darren Fletcher – The Sun

The PM leaving her home in Berkshire earlier


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Prime Minister Theresa May’s voice cracked with emotion as is broke down at the end of an emotional speech this morning confirming she is quitting Downing Street and resigning as the Conservative leader on June 7. She said: “I will shortly leave the job that has been the honour of my life to hold. The second female prime minister, but certainly not the last. I do so with no ill will but with enormous and enduring gratitude to have had the opportunity to serve the country love.”

Mrs May also told of her sadness and “deep regret” at not being able to deliver Brexit, saying: “I negotiated the terms of our exit. I have done everything I can to convince MPs to back that deal. Sadly I have not been able to do so.”

The Prime Minister’s resignation now triggers a leadership contest to be held in the following weeks.

Speculation has been rife as to who might replace the current Prime Minister.

The new Tory leader is expected to be announced before Parliament breaks for its summer holiday, the party said.

Here is what the bookies are predicting:

Former Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson is the bookies current favourite for the top job, according to the bookies. 

Paddy Power’s estimates for next Prime Minister are:

Boris Johnson 6/4
Dominic Raab 6/1
David Lidington 9/1
Jeremy Hunt 12/1 
Andrea Leadsom 12/1 
Michael Gove 14/1
Penny Mordaunt 20/1
Rory Stewart 22/1
Sajid Javid 22/1
Nigel Farage 25/1 
Jeremy Corbyn 33/1
Amber Rudd 80/1
Jacob Rees- Mogg 80/1

READ MORE: THERESA MYA RESIGNS: PM IN TEARS AS SHE ADMITS SHE FAILED ‘THE COUNTRY I LOVE’

Betfair’s Katie Bayliss said: “With Theresa May announcing this morning she will resign on the 7th June, the race is now on for Tory Leader and it’s no surprise that it’s Boris Johnson the clear leader of the pack at odds of 6/4 from 11/4 just a few days ago.

“With the leadership of the party having been such a hot topic for months, we’ve seen more than £1m bet on this market, with almost £300k on Boris – around a quarter of all money wagered.

“His main competition, as far as punters are concerned, is Dominic Raab at 6/1, while Michael Gove and Jeremy Hunt are both at 12/1.

“Next in the betting is Andrea Leadsom at 15/1, her odds shortening following her resignation as leader from the House of Commons from 23/1 earlier this week.”

Alex Apati of Ladbrokes said: “No name has been shorter than Boris Johnson in the next PM betting and we wouldn’t be surprised to see that price shorten even more over the coming days.”

READ MORE: UK VOTES LEAVE AGAIN: FARAGE’S BREXIT PARTY SET FOR HUGE WIN IN EUROPEAN ELECTIONS – POLL

Former London mayor Boris Johnson, usually one of Mrs May’s strongest critics, tweeted after her speech: “A very dignified statement from Theresa May.

“Thank you for your stoical service to our country and the Conservative Party. It is now time to follow her urgings: to come together and deliver Brexit.”

Mr Johnson confirmed last week to BBC news he would run for leadership of the Conservatives if May quit.

When asked, he replied: “Of course I’m going to go for it.”

He has the support of Jacob Rees-Mogg, who has previously backed Mr Johnson, saying: “I think very highly of Boris Johnson, who managed to win in London twice in a Labour area, has a great connection with voters.

“He is a clear Eurosceptic but otherwise is very much in the middle of the Conservative Party.

READ MORE: MPS REACT AS THERESA MAY BREAKS DOWN IN RESIGNATION SPEECH – ‘PREMIERSHIP WAS DOOMED’

“He is not particularly a factional character beyond the European issue and therefore I think could unite the party and win an election.”

Andrea Leadsom, who resigned as Leader of the House of Commons yesterday, is another one of the favourites.

Speaking to the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show last month, Mrs Leadsom refused to rule out another campaign.

She said: “I will be thinking about that when the time comes, but for now I’m supporting the Prime Minister to get Brexit through.”

Moves to send more troops into the Middle East shows President Donald Trump is serious about deterring Iran from launching attacks against U.S. interests or allies, Rep. Pete King said Friday.

“The last thing he wants is war, but on the other hand, he can’t allow Iran to think they can get away with attacks against us or our allies,” the New York Republican told Fox News’ “America’s Newsroom.”

“The president is doing the right thing. I think the president in the world we live in today has to have this power.”

On Friday, officials reported the Trump administration plans to send a few thousand more troops to U.S. Central Command, which oversees Middle East military operations, reports The Washington Post. The decision was made late Thursday in a meeting between Trump and Pentagon leaders.

The Joint Chiefs of Staff also support the move, said King, as they believe the build-up is not large, but it is significant and “sends a strong signal to Iran.”

Meanwhile, Hamas has enacted austerity plans, noted show host Bill Hemmer, and Shia militia groups have been told to uncover new revenue sources. King said that shows sanctions are working.

“Iran is more vulnerable than it had been,” said King. “Iran is a state terror nation and to the extent, we can weaken them and they run short on cash or assets it’s extremely important and again it strengthens our hand. You combine that with the military deterrents and what the president I think is doing is really reducing the threat of war at the same time reducing the threat from Iran.”

Source: NewsMax

Catholic League President Bill Donohue blasted passage a bill by the California State Senate, which he says will “require” priests “to violate the seal of confessional.”

State senators voted 30-4 to approve the bill requiring Catholic priests to report to civil authorities when a penitent confesses to sexual abuse of a minor.

Donohue, in an emailed statement, called the bill “a frontal assault on religious freedom.”

This bill is absolutely unenforceable,” he said. “No priest is going to respect it and violate the sanctity of the confessional. Moreover, Catholics are not required to respect unjust laws—and this is a clear example of such a law.”

The bill now goes before the State Assembly.

“It is all smoke and mirrors,” Donohue said. “It will do nothing to help protect minors from the scourge of sexual abuse. “ 

Source: NewsMax

President Donald Trump and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi are in the middle of a “short-term breakup” but now it’s time for them to “calm it down a bit,” and get back to business, Rep. Pete King said Friday.

“I understand Nancy Pelosi has to satisfy her base,” the New York Republican told Fox News’ “America’s Newsroom.” “She has to say some anti-Trump comments about impeachment but she went too far. You can’t call the president of the United States a criminal an hour before you go in to have bipartisan negotiations and talks, so the speaker was wrong in doing that.”

Trump walked out of an infrastructure meeting with Pelosi and other Democratic leaders on Wednesday after Pelosi accused him of engaging in a cover-up.

Pelosi “has a left-wing base trying to put her in a direction she doesn’t want to go,” said King, but she must “control that base without directly insulting and not calling the president of the United States a criminal.”

On Thursday, Pelosi, D-Calif., doubled down on her cover-up comments and said Trump’s family should stage an intervention with him “for the good of the country.”

Trump shot back that Pelosi is “crazy” and “a mess” and referred to himself as a “stable genius.”

King said he also thinks Trump has gotten “inside Nancy’s head,” as her attacks have become more personal, but both parties are “tough fighters and know what they’re doing.”

Meanwhile, if they could calm down their attacks, Trump could sit and negotiate with Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and talk about infrastructure, which is more important, said King.

“They’ve taken their shots,” said King. “Declare victory and go on.”

Source: NewsMax

The American Civil Liberties Union is seeking $100 million on behalf of the family of a Guatemalan woman who was shot to death by a U.S. Border Patrol agent, CBS News is reporting.

The legal claim was filed Thursday – one year after Claudia Patricia Gómez González, 20, was killed.

The ACLU claims she “posed no threat to anyone, as would have been obvious from the slightest glance.” The claim says she was unarmed.

CBS News said that Gómez González, along with several migrants, had crossed the southern border and were confronted by a Border Patrol agent, who opened fire.

The claim, filed by the ACLU of Texas, demands $50 million each for personal injury and her wrongful death.

“Her life was as valuable as anyone else’s, and her family deserves justice for their loss,” said Andre Segura, the group’s legal director. “Our government has a responsibility to treat everyone lawfully, humanely, and with respect regardless of how they came into this country.”

U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the Border Patrol’s parent agency, maintained a member of the group rushed the agent and ignored orders to get on the ground. It claimed the agent fired one round.

Gómez González had left for the U.S. after living in poverty and not being able to find work, CBS News reported.

Source: NewsMax

TEARFUL Theresa May today finally admitted her time was up and quit as Prime Minister insisting: “I’ve done my best”.

The PM was forced to resign after she failed to deliver Brexit and lost the support of her own MPs – but will continue in office as a lame duck until July.

 The PM broke down with emotion as she announced her resignation

Reuters

The PM broke down with emotion as she announced her resignation
 Mrs May could barely complete her speech on the steps of Downing Street

Dan Charity – The Sun

Mrs May could barely complete her speech on the steps of Downing Street
 The PM delivering her resignation statement

Reuters

The PM delivering her resignation statement
 Mrs May walking back into No10 after resigning

PA:Press Association

Mrs May walking back into No10 after resigning
 Philip May watching on as his wife speaks

AFP or licensors

Philip May watching on as his wife speaks

Shortly after meeting Tory “executioner” Sir Graham Brady, she addressed the nation in the spring sunshine of Downing Street – watched by adoring husband Philip – and admitted her time is up.

The PM confessed she now has no chance of ever getting her Brexit deal through Parliament but insisted “I have done my best” to deliver on the referendum result.

As Mrs May enters her final days:

Today the PM claimed she had done all she could to take Britain out of the EU with a deal, saying: “Ever since I first stepped through the door behind me as Prime Minister, I have striven to make the United Kingdom a country that works not just for a privileged few, but for everyone. And to honour the result of the EU referendum.

“If you give people a choice you have a duty to implement what they decide. I have done my best to do that.

“Sadly I have not been able to do so. I tried three times – I believe it was right to persevere even when the odds against success seemed high.”

Her voice cracking, she attempted to defend her legacy and insisted she has helped to fix Britain’s “burning injustices”.

Mrs May concluded: “I will shortly leave the job it has been the honour of my life to hold – the second female Prime Minister, but certainly not the last.

“I do so with no ill will but with enormous and enduring gratitude to have had the opportunity to serve the country I love.”

After her speech, the PM and Philip May drove off to spend the Bank Holiday weekend at their home in Sonning, Berkshire.

A VERY LONG GOODBYE

Mrs May will stay in office for the next two weeks, allowing her to welcome Donald Trump to the UK on his state visit, and step down as party leader on June 7.

She will then continue as interim PM until a new Tory leader is chosen, and finally leave office in July.

Even after leaving No10, she plans to stay as MP for Maidenhead until the next election scheduled for 2022.

In a snap poll, two thirds of Brits said Mrs May was right to resign – and half said she had been a “bad” or “terrible” Prime Minister.

Jeremy Corbyn today called for the new PM to trigger a snap General Election and let voters decide who should lead the country, saying: “The Prime Minister is right to have resigned. She has now accepted what the country has known for months – she cannot govern, and nor can her divided and disintegrating party.

“Parliament is deadlocked and the Conservatives offer no solutions to the other major challenges facing our country. Whoever becomes the new Conservative leader must let the people decide our country’s future, through an immediate General Election.”

The embattled Mrs May ran out of road this week after her Brexit deal collapsed and ally Andrea Leadsom stormed out of the Cabinet.

Her resignation fires the starting gun on the Tory leadership race, with Boris Johnson at the head of a crowded field of contenders.

But the next PM could face the same Brexit deadlock as Mrs May – with Parliament and the Tory party bitterly divided over how to move forward.

Today European leaders insisted there is no prospect of ripping up the withdrawal agreement and starting talks again – although Irish PM Leo Varadkar admitted he was worried about the prospects for his country.

He said: “In the next couple of months we may see the election of a Eurosceptic Prime Minister who wants to repudiate the withdrawal agreement and go for a No Deal.”

David Davis said the new leader should return to Brussels and demand the EU remove the hated backstop from the existing deal.

And Boris said: “We will leave the EU on October 31, deal or No Deal.”

Tories today rallied around to praise Mrs May for her time in office – even the ones who stabbed in her in the back and quit her Government.

This is a sad but necessary day

Steve Baker

Mrs Leadsom, whose resignation earlier this week helped lead to Mrs May’s departure, tweeted: “A very dignified speech by @theresa_may.

“An illustration of her total commitment to country and duty. She did her utmost, and I wish her all the very best.”

Hardline rebel Steve Baker said: “Very dignified statement from Theresa May, beginning to set out the many things which she has achieved in office. This is a sad but necessary day.”

Leadership candidate Dominic Raab, who is set to run to replace Mrs May, said: “Dignified as ever, @theresa_may showed her integrity. She remains a dedicated public servant, patriot and loyal Conservative.”

Boris Johnson added: “Thank you for your stoical service to our country and the Conservative Party. It is now time to follow her urgings: to come together and deliver Brexit.”

Health Secretary Matt Hancock, who is also tipped to run for the leadership, said: “Incredibly moving and dignified speech from the Prime Minister. She has given all in service of her country. Thank you Theresa.”

Home Secretary Sajid Javid said: “Nobody could have worked harder or had a greater sense of public duty than the Prime Minister.”

Simon Hoare, one of Mrs May’s closest allies, joked: “I hope there’s a most enormous gin awaiting the PM.”

Paying tribute to his successor, David Cameron said: “I know what it feels like when you come to realise that your leadership time has finished, that the country needs a new leader.

“It’s extremely difficult and painful to step outside Downing Street and say those things.

“She will be remembered as someone who worked very hard on our behalf. A dedicated public servant, who was passionate about the future of this country.”

‘I have done my best’: Theresa May’s resignation speech in full

Ever since I first stepped through the door behind me as Prime Minister, I have striven to make the United Kingdom a country that works not just for a privileged few, but for everyone.

And to honour the result of the EU referendum.

Back in 2016, we gave the British people a choice.

Against all predictions, the British people voted to leave the European Union.

I feel as certain today as I did three years ago that in a democracy, if you give people a choice you have a duty to implement what they decide.

I have done my best to do that.

I negotiated the terms of our exit and a new relationship with our closest neighbours that protects jobs, our security and our Union.

I have done everything I can to convince MPs to back that deal.

Sadly, I have not been able to do so.

I tried three times.

I believe it was right to persevere, even when the odds against success seemed high.

But it is now clear to me that it is in the best interests of the country for a new Prime Minister to lead that effort.

So I am today announcing that I will resign as leader of the Conservative and Unionist Party on Friday 7 June so that a successor can be chosen.

I have agreed with the Party Chairman and with the Chairman of the 1922 Committee that the process for electing a new leader should begin in the following week.

I have kept Her Majesty the Queen fully informed of my intentions, and I will continue to serve as her Prime Minister until the process has concluded.

It is, and will always remain, a matter of deep regret to me that I have not been able to deliver Brexit.

It will be for my successor to seek a way forward that honours the result of the referendum.

To succeed, he or she will have to find consensus in Parliament where I have not.

Such a consensus can only be reached if those on all sides of the debate are willing to compromise.

For many years the great humanitarian Sir Nicholas Winton – who saved the lives of hundreds of children by arranging their evacuation from Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia through the Kindertransport – was my constituent in Maidenhead.

At another time of political controversy, a few years before his death, he took me to one side at a local event and gave me a piece of advice.

He said, “Never forget that compromise is not a dirty word. Life depends on compromise.”

He was right.

As we strive to find the compromises we need in our politics – whether to deliver Brexit, or to restore devolved government in Northern Ireland – we must remember what brought us here.

Because the referendum was not just a call to leave the EU but for profound change in our country.

A call to make the United Kingdom a country that truly works for everyone. I am proud of the progress we have made over the last three years.

We have completed the work that David Cameron and George Osborne started: the deficit is almost eliminated, our national debt is falling and we are bringing an end to austerity.

My focus has been on ensuring that the good jobs of the future will be created in communities across the whole country, not just in London and the South East, through our Modern Industrial Strategy.

We have helped more people than ever enjoy the security of a job.

We are building more homes and helping first-time buyers onto the housing ladder – so young people can enjoy the opportunities their parents did.

And we are protecting the environment, eliminating plastic waste, tackling climate change and improving air quality.

This is what a decent, moderate and patriotic Conservative Government, on the common ground of British politics, can achieve – even as we tackle the biggest peacetime challenge any government has faced.

I know that the Conservative Party can renew itself in the years ahead.

That we can deliver Brexit and serve the British people with policies inspired by our values.

Security; freedom; opportunity.

Those values have guided me throughout my career.

But the unique privilege of this office is to use this platform to give a voice to the voiceless, to fight the burning injustices that still scar our society.

That is why I put proper funding for mental health at the heart of our NHS long-term plan.

It is why I am ending the postcode lottery for survivors of domestic abuse.

It is why the Race Disparity Audit and gender pay reporting are shining a light on inequality, so it has nowhere to hide.

And that is why I set up the independent public inquiry into the tragedy at Grenfell Tower – to search for the truth, so nothing like it can ever happen again, and so the people who lost their lives that night are never forgotten.

Because this country is a Union.

Not just a family of four nations.

But a union of people – all of us.

Whatever our background, the colour of our skin, or who we love.

We stand together.

And together we have a great future.

Our politics may be under strain, but there is so much that is good about this country. So much to be proud of. So much to be optimistic about.

I will shortly leave the job that it has been the honour of my life to hold – the second female Prime Minister but certainly not the last.

I do so with no ill-will, but with enormous and enduring gratitude to have had the opportunity to serve the country I love.

Mrs May had been warned that if she didn’t quit today, Sir Graham would start the process to force her out through a new no-confidence vote.

And Cabinet ministers threatened to bring down the Government if the PM didn’t abandon her attempts to force through the Withdrawal Agreement Bill.

Meanwhile the Tories face a near-total wipeout when the Euro election results are announced on Sunday night.

This morning Mrs May faced one final blow to her authority as Helen Grant resigned as Tory party vice-chair, saying she wants to be involved in the leadership race by backing Dominic Raab.

The Prime Minister wanted her legacy to be taking Britain out of the EU, before turning to the “burning injustices” of UK society.

Instead she will remembered for her stubborn refusal to compromise and inability to unite her party.

Her last-ditch bid to save the Brexit deal by offering MPs a vote on whether to hold a second referendum proved the last nail in her coffin, triggering a Cabinet rebellion with Andrea Leadsom resigning.

Mrs May’s resignation will kickstart a furious race to replace her with Boris Johnson the favourite to take over.

Mr Raab, Jeremy Hunt and Michael Gove are also considered frontrunners – but as many as 20 Tory MPs could throw their hats in the ring.

Today Mr Hunt confirmed he’s planning to run for No10 while in a surprise move Sir Graham quit his 1922 Committee position to launch his own run for the leadership.

The leadership election is set to be hugely divisive for the Tory party with the two different wings attacking each other over what should happen next with Brexit.

It’s not just Theresa! Vince Cable to quit in July too

VINCE Cable today announced he will ALSO step down in late July – almost exactly the same time as Theresa May.

The Lib Dems boss revealed he’ll hand over to a successor on July 23.

He previously revealed he was planning to resign as party leader after the European Parliament elections.

Today he formally kicked off a two-month leadership election with Jo Swinson and Ed Davey favourites to replace him.

Sir Vince told members: “Our campaigning over the last three years has kept the cause of remaining in the European Union alive, and I now believe we have a strong chance of stopping Brexit.”

He took over in 2017 with the party at a low ebb having suffered two poor General Election results.

But the Lib Dems have since risen in the polls, with a strong showing in the recent local elections.

 Mrs May admitted she had failed to deliver Brexit

London News Pictures

Mrs May admitted she had failed to deliver Brexit
 May faces the world's press in Downing Street

Rex Features

May faces the world’s press in Downing Street
 The PM looked broken and her voice shook as she ended her speech

AFP or licensors

The PM looked broken and her voice shook as she ended her speech
 May breaks down as she turns from the cameras after her emotional speech

SWNS:South West News Service

May breaks down as she turns from the cameras after her emotional speech
 The PM and Philip leaving Downing Street to head to Berkshire

London News Pictures

The PM and Philip leaving Downing Street to head to Berkshire

What next after Theresa May quits?

THERESA May’s resignation today kickstarts the Tory leadership election.

The Prime Minister will formally stand down as party leader on June 7 – but will stay in place while the new PM is being chosen, rather than handing over to an interim chief such as David Lidington.

The leadership contest, overseen by party chairman Brandon Lewis, will take around six weeks.

Any Tory MP can enter the race, and the list of contenders is then whittled down by the parliamentary party.

MPs vote in multiple rounds, eliminating one candidate each time until just two are left.

The party’s 120,000 activists then choose behind the final shortlist of two, with the winner declared leader and Prime Minister.

When Mrs May became leader, she didn’t have to submit to a vote of members because Andrea Leadsom pulled out of the race.

So the last time activists have had a say on the leadership was 2005, when David Cameron defeated David Davis.

Former PM David Cameron ‘feels desperately sorry’ for Theresa May after resignation announcement

Today top Brexiteer Steve Baker insisted the next leader must be someone who is fully committed to our EU departure and ready to leave with No Deal.

Jacob Rees-Mogg added: “A new leader can get us out of the EU on October 31, that is in law. Once that’s happened, then we can move on to other issues.”

But the veteran Europhile Ken Clarke hit back, saying: “The idea that Conservative and DUP MPs will all come together behind a Nigel Farage-type figure is nonsense.”

 Mrs May's top team watching her resignation statement

AFP or licensors

Mrs May’s top team watching her resignation statement
 The PM made her statement in front of her official residence

Reuters

The PM made her statement in front of her official residence
 The PM at the end of her statement

AFP or licensors

The PM at the end of her statement
Jeremy Corbyn calls for an immediate General Election after PM Theresa May’s resignation


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LONDON (AP) — Bowing to the inevitable, Theresa May announced Friday that she will step down as U.K. Conservative Party leader in two weeks, admitting defeat in her attempt to take Britain out of the European Union and sparking a contest to replace her as prime minister.

May said she will quit as head of the governing party on June 7 but stay as caretaker prime minister until the new leader is chosen, a process the Conservatives aim to complete by late July.

The new Conservative leader will become prime minister without the need for a general election, and will take up the task of trying to secure Britain’s exit from the EU.

May, who has been battling to unite her fractious party ever since she took the helm almost three years ago, said “I have done my best.” But she conceded that had not been enough.

Her voice breaking, May said in a televised statement outside 10 Downing St. that she would soon be leaving a job that it has been “the honor of my life to hold.”

May became prime minister the month after the U.K. voted in June 2016 to leave the European Union, and her premiership has been consumed by the attempt to deliver on that verdict.

May spent more than a year and a half negotiating an exit agreement with the EU, only to see it rejected three times by Britain’s Parliament.

Many Conservative lawmakers came to see May as the main obstacle to leaving the bloc, although her replacement will face the same issue: a Parliament deeply divided over whether to exit the EU, and how close a relationship to seek with Europe after it does.

Now she has quit over her failure to take Britain out of the EU on the scheduled date of March 29. Britain is currently due to leave the EU on Oct. 31, but Parliament has yet to approve divorce terms.

“I negotiated the terms of our exit and a new relationship with our closest neighbors that protects jobs, our security and our Union,” May said. “I have done everything I can to convince MPs to back that deal. Sadly, I have not been able to do so.”

“It is now clear to me that it is in the best interests of the country for a new prime minister to lead that effort,” she added.

Multiple contenders are already jockeying to replace her and take up the challenge of securing Britain’s EU exit. The early front-runner is Boris Johnson, a former foreign secretary and strong champion of Brexit.

Pressure on May reached breaking point this week as House of Commons Leader Andrea Leadsom quit and several Cabinet colleagues expressed doubts about the bill she planned to put before Parliament in a fourth attempt to secure lawmakers’ backing for her Brexit blueprint.

Leadsom, another likely contender to replace May, joined colleagues in paying tribute to the departing leader. She tweeted that May’s “dignified speech” had been “an illustration of her total commitment to country and duty. She did her utmost, and I wish her all the very best.”

Johnson, whose relentless criticism helped push May out of the door, tweeted: “Thank you for your stoical service to our country and the Conservative Party. It is now time to follow her urgings: to come together and deliver Brexit.”

But Johnson, or any other successor, will face a tough challenge to unite a country and a Parliament still deeply divided over the country’s relationship with Europe.

The next British leader is likely to be a staunch Brexiteer, who will try to renegotiate the divorce deal, and if that fails to leave the bloc without an agreement on departure terms.

Most businesses and economists think that would cause economic turmoil and plunge Britain into recession. Parliament has voted to rule out a no-deal Brexit, though it remains the legal default option.

Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon, an opponent of Brexit, tweeted that May’s exit “will not solve the Brexit mess that the Tories have created. … The prospect of an even more hardline Brexiteer now becoming PM and threatening a no deal exit is deeply concerning.”

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker praised May as “a woman of courage” for whom he has great respect.

EU spokeswoman Mina Andreeva said Juncker would “equally respect and establish working relations” with any new British leader. But the bloc insists it will not renegotiate the Brexit deal.

“We have set out our position on the withdrawal agreement and on the political declaration,” Andreeva said.

Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte tweeted that the “agreement reached between the EU and the United Kingdom for an ordered Brexit remains on the table.”

Angela Merkel’s spokeswoman, Martina Fietz, said the German chancellor noted May’s decision “with respect” and would continue to work closely with her successor for “an orderly exit.”

In an emotional departure speech, with close aides and her husband Philip looking on, May said “I will shortly leave the job that it has been the honor of my life to hold – the second female prime minister but certainly not the last.”

“I do so with no ill will, but with enormous and enduring gratitude to have had the opportunity to serve the country I love.”

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Associated Press writers Gregory Katz in London, Raf Casert in Brussels and David Rising in Berlin contributed.

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Follow AP’s full coverage of Brexit at: https://www.apnews.com/Brexit


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